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The Delicate Artwork of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Method to Dwelling a Good Life

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life

  • The Delicate Artwork of Not Giving a Fuck

#1 New York Instances Bestseller

Over three million copies offered

On this generation-defining self-help information, a celebrity blogger cuts via the crap to indicate us the right way to cease attempting to be “constructive” on a regular basis in order that we will really grow to be higher, happier folks.

For many years, we’ve been informed that constructive pondering is the important thing to a contented, wealthy life. “F**ok positivity,” Mark Manson says. “Let’s be sincere, shit is f**ked and we have now to dwell with it.” In his wildly widespread Web weblog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it’s—a dose of uncooked, refreshing, sincere fact that’s sorely missing right this moment. The Delicate Artwork of Not Giving a F**ok is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has contaminated fashionable society and spoiled a era, rewarding them with gold medals only for displaying up.

Manson makes the argument, backed each by educational analysis and well-timed poop jokes, that bettering our lives hinges not on our means to show lemons into lemonade, however on studying to abdomen lemons higher. Human beings are flawed and restricted—”not everyone will be extraordinary, there are winners and losers in society, and a few of it isn’t honest or your fault.” Manson advises us to get to know our limitations and settle for them. As soon as we embrace our fears, faults, and uncertainties, as soon as we cease working and avoiding and begin confronting painful truths, we will start to search out the braveness, perseverance, honesty, duty, curiosity, and forgiveness we search.

There are solely so many issues we may give a f**ok about so we have to determine which of them actually matter, Manson makes clear. Whereas cash is good, caring about what you do together with your life is best, as a result of true wealth is about expertise. A much-needed grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-look-you-in-the-eye second of real-talk, crammed with entertaining tales and profane, ruthless humor, The Delicate Artwork of Not Giving a F**ok is a refreshing slap for a era to assist them lead contented, grounded lives.

Worth: $ 10.01

The Delicate Artwork of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Method to Dwelling a Good Life
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3 thoughts on “The Delicate Artwork of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Method to Dwelling a Good Life

  • May 17, 2018 at 11:49 am
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    4,202 of 4,357 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Much Needed Reminder to Choose Your Battles Wisely, October 30, 2016
    By 
    Amanda Henry (Seattle) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life (Hardcover)
    As someone who has given far too many f***s about far too many things their entire life, this book was exactly the wake up call I needed. Even as a child in elementary school, I would have a miniature meltdown when I got a bad grade or if a friend was mean to me that day. As an adult, I got better at hiding these emotional upheavals and intense reactions to the world around me, but they never really went away with my maturity like I had hoped. I took to heart every disheartening news article I read and every crappy thing that happened to me at work or in school. I’d let it consume me, because I was never told to live life any other way or that controlling my reactions was even remotely possible; I thought it was just a permanent part of my personality. I always knew that it was more of a vice than a virtue, but I felt like I couldn’t fully control it.

    Mark Manson’s The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*** employs a witty use of profanity laced with satirical comedy that’s bursting with philosophical wisdom. Much of Manson’s inspiration originates from nihilists, Buddhists, Albert Camus, and Charles Bukowski, but he brings those philosophies into a more modern and palatable perspective. He reminds us that life is too short to react so passionately about every little thing. We have a limited emotional capacity, and we often squander it on reactions to mean-spirited people or unfortunate events, completely forgetting that, although we can’t control the world around us, we can control ourselves. This book has empowered me to exercise control over my reactions.

    Shortly after reading this book, my husband commented at how “zen” I’ve become. I’m no longer angrily venting to him about all of the various ways the world upsets me. I still allow myself to feel and talk about things that bother me (I’m not aiming to achieve nirvana as a Buddhist monk), but petty things no longer have a hold on me. I let the negativity wash over me now without letting it absorb into my soul, and my life has been much more enjoyable as a result.

    I was so inspired by this book and its philosophy, that I wanted a permanent reminder for myself to further ensure that I use my f***s wisely from now onward. For my birthday, I got this simple, but meaningful tattoo on my right wrist. The ∞ symbol reminds me of the infinite nature of time and outer space, and the 0 on the bottom represents humanity’s relevance to time and space as a whole. It can also be translated as don’t make something (∞) out of nothing (0) or a reminder that there are infinite opportunities to give a f***, but that I will remain steadfast in giving 0 f***s about things that don’t really matter.

    If you’re the type of person who’s struggled to keep their temper in line or if you’re like me and you find yourself on an emotional roller-coaster because you take every event in the world and within your own life to heart, I strongly encourage you to read this book. If profanity is so much of a problem for you, that you can’t tolerate reading the first half of this book (the last half is much less profane) you’re probably too narrow-minded to have taken away any of the many philosophical benefits this book offers.

  • May 17, 2018 at 12:08 pm
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    1,046 of 1,152 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A surprisingly serious book – in a good way, September 14, 2016
    By 
    VH

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life (Hardcover)
    There are a dozen of topics Mark goes through in this book. Some of the main themes are these:

    (1) Choosing what to care about; focusing on the things/problems that are actually meaningful/important (= “giving a f*** about the right things”)
    (2) Learning to be fine with some negative things; always aiming for positivity isn’t practical, and is stressful in itself
    (3) Taking responsibility of your own life; it’s good for your self-esteem not to keep blaming the circumstances for your problems
    (4) Understanding the importance of honesty and boundaries, especially in relationships
    (5) Identity; it might a good idea not to commit strongly to any special identity such as “an undiscovered genius”, because then any challenges will make you fear the potential loss of that identity you’ve clinged to
    (6) Motivation; how to improve it by accepting failure and taking action
    (7) Death; how learning to be more comfortable with one’s own mortality can make it easier to live

    The first 20% of this book were a little bit boring to read, but after that, the experience was very absorbing. Just like Manson’s previous book (Models), I will give this one five stars.

    (BTW this book wasn’t as humorous as I expected. It was much more a serious than a funny book to read. The final chapters, discussing the acceptance of death, made me actually a little bit tense and distressed.)

  • May 17, 2018 at 12:56 pm
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    24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Take responsibility for your own life, March 26, 2018
    By 
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Ark Runner (Little Rock, AR) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life (Hardcover)
    This book is not about absolute nihilism – not giving a f* about anything ever. Instead, the premise is to pare down what we care about, and what we stress over.

    The premise of the book is to look to the things that really matter in life and work on that. That means sometimes taking a hard look inside to see what trivial things we care about, and what mistakes we have made that must be changed. Personal accountability for ones’ own life is paramount.

    The “flow” of this book is a lot more like a blog. It’s an easy read that feels more like a conversation than a treatise on nihilism. At times some of the story-telling goes on a bit longer, and sometimes it feels like there’s a little filler. I think this book could use some edits to condense down the more salient points. (I almost gave 4 instead of 5 stars, but in fairness, it doesn’t detract from the book overall).

    As an aside, I got this book immediately after someone gifted me “The Secret,” which is about as opposite of this book as it gets. While “The Secret” promotes thinking good thoughts so good things will happen (the “thoughts become things” premise), The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F* promotes personal growth and responsibility. I’ve recommended this book to most of my friends, and would recommend to anyone who feels constantly overwhelmed.

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